PILOT EXPERIMENTS CONCERNING AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL DECISION MAKING

This report describes two pilot experiments concerned with a process which is of fundamental importance in the air traffic control system: the discrimination by the controller as to whether confliction between aircraft is probable in a given configuration of traffic. One experiment was done using controllers as subjects in a static simulation of a traffic situation; a second experiment utilized a computer analogy of the procedure the controller might use. In both cases, the experiments were of a type calculated to establish a functional relationship between the information given the controller, and the correctness of his hudgements of confliction imminence. By discovering such functional relationships, the design and development effort for air traffic control system navigational, communications, and data processing and display equipment of the future can be improved by specifying the controller's requirements for information. The primary purpose of the pilot experiments was to determine the advantages and the weaknesses of two experimental methods for obtaining the data required. Many matters of technique were clarified in the course of executing the pilot experiments, and enough substantive information was gained to illustrate the potentialities of the methods for gathering useful knowledge.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Franklin Institute

    20th and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
    Philadelphia, PA  United States  19103
  • Authors:
    • BUCKLEY, E P
    • McLaughlin, F X
    • Benson, S D
  • Publication Date: 1960-4

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00073966
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: FLIGHT TRANSPORTATION LABORATORY, MIT DEPT. OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS
  • Report/Paper Numbers: F-A2169-11
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 5 1974 12:00AM