INSTRUMENT FLIGHT OPERATION OF V/STOL AIRCRAFT IN THE TERMINAL AREA

In addition to the capability of V/STOL aircraft to operate from small unprepared fields, they have a potential for safely achieving "zero-zero" weather operation. They may also prove themselves economically by increasing the capacity of terminal airports through better use of available airspace, given their own instrument approach and landing facilities. To accomplish these goals the aircraft must be operated in partially converted configurations for several minutes under instrument flight conditions. The state-of-the-art limitations imposed by handling qualities, pilot displays, and guidance systems dictate maximum instrument approach angles on the order of 6 degrees and minimum speeds of about 45 knots for operational use. Instrument approach patterns are then determined by the time required for the pilot to establish himself on the approach courses, with the limitation that he handle the minimum number of variables at one time to say within his capabilities, considering present instrument displays. Unfortunately, the minimum time required for such an instrument approach is about 5 minutes which, for jet V/STOL, represents high fuel consumption and a prohibitive reduction in range and payload. Since the pilot can execute an approach and landing in perhaps 1 1/2 minutes under visual conditions, it is apparent that the saving of about 3 1/2 minutes of high-power approach time sets a goal for development of instrument displays and guidance systems. Otherwise, the jet V/STOL, at least, must perform the instrument approach as an airplane weather minima. Until visual contact with the landing area is established.

  • Corporate Authors:

    NASA Langley Research Center

    Hampton, VA  United States 
  • Authors:
    • Reeder, J P
  • Publication Date: 1965-1-12

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00073120
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: FLIGHT TRANSPORTATION LABORATORY, MIT DEPT. OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NASA L-439
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 5 1974 12:00AM