EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF A PRIME MOVER FOR HYBRID VEHICLE USE

A conventional spark-ignition engine was studied as a prime mover for use in a hybrid system. The study involved both steady-state and transient engine operation with ignition timing, air-fuel ratio, exhaust gas recirculation, oxidizing type catalytic converters, engine speed, and power output as variables. Data were obtained from two 1971 model 350 cubic-inch-displacement engines mounted on engine dynamometer stands. When the hybrid engine was operated with an oxidizing catalyst at power output levels required for a 4,000-lb curb weight hybrid vehicle, carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions could be reduced to 1.5 to 2.5 grams per brake horsepower hour and 0.2 to 0.4 grams per brake horsepower hour, respectively. With exhaust gas recirculation, oxides of nitrogen emission levels could be reduced to 1 to 1.5 grams per brake horsepower hour.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Bureau of Mines

    Bartlesville Energy Research Center
    Bartlesville, OK  United States 
  • Authors:
    • Allsup, J R
    • Fleming, R D
  • Publication Date: 1974-12

Media Info

  • Pagination: 38 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00090977
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: RI 7988 Invest Rpt
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 26 1975 12:00AM