A STUDY OF HEAT, NOISE, AND VIBRATION IN RELATION TO DRIVER PERFORMANCE AND PHYSIOLOGICAL STATUS

Three experimental studies were conducted on the highway to determine the effects of heat, noise, and vibration on the driving performance, subjective feelings of alertness and fatigue, and physiological signs of stress among drivers of passenger cars and trucks. Heat stress was shown to significantly affect both driver performance and various indices of central nervous system arousal felt to be important to driving safety. Different levels of noise and vibration stress, typical of many trucking operations, did not differentially affect driver performance. However, it was shown that the noise stress was sufficient to induce permanent hearing loss in some drivers and that the amount of vibration stress, unless compensated for by properly designed seats, was borderline with respect to current standards for 'fatigue-decreased proficiency.' A review of pertinent literature on stress and human reactions to it is included.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Human Factors Research, Incorporated

    6780 Cortona Drive
    Goleta, CA  USA  93017

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  USA  20590
  • Authors:
    • MACKIE, R R
    • O'Hanlon, J F
    • McCauley, M
  • Publication Date: 1974-12

Media Info

  • Pagination: 263 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00090177
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: DOT-HS-801 315 Final Rpt.
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-241-2-420
  • Files: NTIS, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Apr 22 1977 12:00AM