THE EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON MARINE MICROBIAL PROCESSES: A FIELD STUDY

Previous studies under the contract have shown that low concentrations of chemical pollutants adversely affect microbial processes in seawater. In this technical report, results are described of a field study of this phenomenon. Red Sea corals were used as a model. The author shows that low concentration of crude oil, copper and available organic matter, which were insufficient to kill the corals directly, upset the microbiological balance on the coral surface. The pollutants stimulated excessive mucus production by the coral. Bacteria were attracted to the mucus and grew on it. Three factors associated with bacteria growth were responsible for the death of the coral colonies: (1) Oxygen depletion; (2) chemical toxins; and (3) bacterial predators, particularly Beggiotoa. (Modified author abstract)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Harvard University

    Division of Engineering and Applied Science, 29 Oxford Street
    Cambridge, MA  USA  02138

    Office of Naval Research

    Department of the Navy, 800 North Quincy Street
    Arlington, VA  USA  22217
  • Authors:
    • Mitchell, R
  • Publication Date: 1974-9

Media Info

  • Pagination: 44 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00084817
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TR-6
  • Contract Numbers: N00014-67A-0298-0026
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 19 1975 12:00AM