THE RELATIVE COST EFFECTIVENESS OF "30 AND 6" DRIVER EDUCATION AND SIMULATOR TRAINING IN SELECT TEXAS PUBLIC SCHOOLS

An investigation was conducted to determine if students who were taught in a "30 and 6" or a simulator program have better driving records than students without driver education, and to ascertain relative cost per student for providing these programs in various size schools under different instructional conditions. The investigation was also designed to establish which type program produced students with better driving records, i.e., fewer convictions and accidents and less severe accidents, as well as to find which type program developed better results in a driving record for the amount of revenue expended. The study, which tested five null hypotheses, revealed that using conviction criterion, students of "30 and 6" programs had no better driving records than students without driver education. However, using accident criterion, students of "30 and 6" had significantly greater accident involvement than their matched members. Findings are recorded with respect to students of simulator training. Observations related to studies using conviction, accident, and severity of accident are also presented. It is concluded that "30 and 6" driver education as taught in 1965-66 was not fulfilling its objectives, nor was accident avoidance adequately emphasized in the simulator program of 1968-69. A list of recommendations is presented.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Study sponsored by Texas Education Agency.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Texas A&M University, College Station

    College of Education
    College Station, TX  USA 
  • Authors:
    • Koehler, M
  • Publication Date: 1973-1

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 195 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00081463
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: SRIS
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 26 1975 12:00AM