REQUIREMENTS AND CONSTRAINTS IN THE DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION OF GAS TURBINE ENGINES FOR THE NAVY

An improved approach by the Navy to the development and qualification of aircraft gas turbine engines is discussed. Rather than focusing on performance/functional aspects, the new approach emphasizes durability testing throughout the engine development program. The intent of each phase of the program is discussed, as well as the major tests required to meet the goals of each phase. Extensive mission-oriented flight test data generated by the Navy over three years form a basis for the durability tests. Engine durability testing was divided into three categories: testing to assure structural life of cold parts (accelerated low cycle fatigue test), to assure hot part lives (accelerated simulated mission endurance test), and to assure that durability is not excessively compromised by operation under any of the allowable specification conditions (durability proof test). The approach is intended to: reduce the potential rate of early engine failures; reduce the probability of random, or chance, failures in service; assure that an acceptable level of durability has been built into the engine; and reduce the potential for expensive retrofits. Other related Navy programs are described: the exploratory/advanced propulsion system programs, and the Lead-the-Fleet Reliability Program.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Presented at SAE Aerospace Meeting, San Diego, 27-30 November 1978.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)

    400 Commonwealth Drive
    Warrendale, PA  United States  15096
  • Authors:
    • Dell, M E
    • Mead, M D
  • Publication Date: 1978

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00399190
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: SAE 780994, HS-025 608U
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: Oct 31 1985 12:00AM