PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF TWO MULTI LINK ROAD EXPERIMENTS COMPARING THE USE OF IN-CAR DYNAMIC ADVISORY SPEEDS WITH NORMAL DRIVING

A single small car was computer equipped to display speeds to the driver, thus simulating dynamic advisory roadside signs. The car was driven along a 3.5 km arterial road in peak and off-peak periods under vehicle actuated signals, controlled by flexible fixed time or adaptive traffic responsive modes. The main experiment was carried out over eight fixed time and four adaptive days. The eight drivers were given different types of speed advice, but only on the fixed time days. The display speed limit, speed increment and frequency of display were varied. The best advice saved 3.8% in fuel over the mean of the advice condition, which was in turn 3.9% better than the free choice runs. No significant difference was found between the fixed time and adaptive modes although that aspect of the experiment was not as sensitive as the rest. An auxiliary experiment, to obviate the problem of the learning behaviour of the original drivers and to extend the results to surrounding traffic, used two different drivers instructed with float and chase techniques and a fuel saving mode. This suggested a fuel saving of 15% when the best advice condition of the main experiment was compared with the surrounding traffic. This, and the stops and travel times, tally with previously reported work.

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 143-154
  • Serial:
    • Volume: 12

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00396896
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 31 1985 12:00AM