A STUDY OF TWENTY-FIVE YEAR OLD PULVERIZED FUEL ASH CONCRETE USED IN FOUNDATION STRUCTURES

It is unusual for detailed records to be preserved beyond the construction stages of reinforced concrete structures, but one exception occurs in the case of the concrete foundations of the 275 kv substation at High Marnham Power Station built in 1957. Twenty-Five years later these foundations have been examined in detail and the paper presents findings of this examination. Modern examination techniques have been employed to investigate the concrete, and the results have been compared with construction data recorded in a 1958 report. This is a rare, possibly unique, investigation into the performance of concrete placed with a 20% replacement of the cement with pulverized fuel ash (pfa). It is particularly relevant that the pfa used did not comply with the present British standard specification. Nevertheless, the compressive and tensile strengths continued to improve beyond that achieved by all-cement control samples. Consideration of durability shows that the pfa concrete had a marked advantage. Even at 25 years virtually no carbonation could be found. It is suggested that the lower porosity and much smaller pore size found in the pfa concrete contributed largely to this excellent durability performance. (Author/TRRL)

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 149-165
  • Serial:
    • Volume: 79

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00396208
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 31 1986 12:00AM