THE SAFETY, OPERATIONAL, AND COST IMPACTS OF PEDESTRIAN INDICATIONS AT SIGNALIZED INTERSECTIONS

Pedestrian signals have been used in the United States since the 1920s. Although these signals are viewed by many as a safety improvement, studies to date have not entirely sustained this premise. Other studies have centered on improving operational efficiency of pedestrian signals through timing, phasing, and uniformity of displays. In addition to these safety and operational considerations, energy conservation and reduced operation and maintenance revenues are added justification for optimal and judicious use of pedestrian signals. The effects that pedestrian signal indications have on safety, operations, and cost are examined. Information is drawn from the literature and analyses of accidents, delay, and benefits versus cost. The study concludes that there is evidence indicating that pedestrian signals are overused and thus contribute to unnecessary costs and delays and possibly reduced safety. A need exists for the more judicious use of pedestrian indications at signalized intersections.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 1-7
  • Monograph Title: PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE FACILITIES
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00394951
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-038 225
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 31 1985 12:00AM