AUTOS, TRANSIT, AND THE SPRAWL OF LOS ANGELES: THE 1920S

The dispersed, low-density land use pattern characteristic of Los Angeles has roots in two periods of economic growth, then critical choices were made. Although many observers associate the sprawl of Los Angeles with freeway building after World War II, the pattern was well established before 1930. It can be traced to an early period of dispersed growth, from 1880 to 1910, when interurban street railways encouraged residential decentralization. An examination is made of changes during those periods in the context of a continuing preference for low-density living. This study also reviews the planning policies and political decisions of the twenties, particularly the adoption of a comprehensive highway program and the failure of a regional rapid transit plan to gain acceptance.

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  • Accession Number: 00394484
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Engineering Index
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 31 1985 12:00AM