UITP 46TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS, BRUSSELS 1985. NO. 4B, APPENDIX 3. BUS MAINTENANCE YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW

Many buses built today will have been retired or be held in reserve fleets by the year 2000. Then, as now, maintenance of buses will continue to be of importance from the economic, operating and staff points of view. Automotive developments will intensify the trends to the low-maintenance bus. Technology of materials, mtallurgy, plastics and microelectronics is critical in production of buses with lower maintenance requirements. Many novel design features in today's buses have changed maintenance requirements, and this is further complicated by features which enhance passenger comfort and ease demands on drivers. Legal requirements will, as in the past, be involved in bus maintenance planning for the year 2000. As vehicles age, there is a rise in maintenance costs, an expense category second only to bus driver costs. While robotics will probably take over a portion of the technically simpler maintenance jobs, trained specialists will increasingly be required in the electrical, electronic and hydraulic trades. And while there must be expectation of new technologies, contemporary buses have reached a high technical level and existing technologies will probably be the basis for building buses up to the year 2000.

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 49-54

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00399604
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 30 1985 12:00AM