THE AMERICAN AND JAPANESE AUTO INDUSTRIES IN TRANSITION. REPORT OF THE JOINT U.S.-JAPAN AUTOMOTIVE STUDY

In view of the importance of stable, long-term economic and political relationships between Japan and the U.S., automotive issues have to be dealt with in ways consistent with the joint prosperity of both countries. With these considerations in mind, the Joint U.S.-Japan Automotive Study project identified 4 forces that will determine the future course of the industry in both countries: (1) consumers demands vis-a-vis automobiles; (2) flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); (3) rapidly evolving technology and (4) the internalization of the automotive industry. The dilemma facing the industrialized nations is the problem of making short-term adjustments to the macro political and economic problems without succumbing to a deteriorating cycle of long-term restrictions, stagnation and decline. With the objective of resolving this dilemma and furthering the adjustments to new competitive forces, the study narrowed the problems to the following areas: (1) macroeconomic policy; (2) exchange rate; (3) market access; (4) technological progress; (5) manufacturing cost differences; (6) manufacturer-supplier relations; (7) human resource management; and (8) public policy.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

    Center for Japanese Studies, 108 Lane Hall
    Ann Arbor, MI  United States  48109

    Technova Incorporated

    2-2 Uchisaiwai-cho, 2-chome, Chiyoda-ku
    Tokyo 100,   Japan 
  • Authors:
    • McCracken, P W
    • OSHIMA, K
  • Publication Date: 1984

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 223 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00394224
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: P-147, HS-037 800
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: May 31 1985 12:00AM