EDITOR'S REPORT: AIR BAGS: 15 YEARS OF ARGUMENTS, WITH NO END IN SIGHT

This editorial narrates the story of airbags and passive restraints from 1969 when the government first proposed that auto makers install air bags, to mid-July 1984, when the Secretary of Transportation announced a regulation that would require the installation of passive restraints--either air bags or automatic safety belts--on 10 percent of all cars sold after September 1, 1986; 25 percent of new cars sold after September 1, 1987; 40 percent after September 1, 1988; and finally on all cars sold after September 1, 1989. Lawyers for the National Association of Independent Insurers have already filed suit in a federal court claiming that the decision was illegal. The editorial concludes that the federal government should lead the fight for mandatory belt use laws and not leave it to the states, the insurance companies should stop litigating and start building incentives into their policies to encourage belt use, and the automobile industry should start designing more passive safety devices into their cars.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Hearst Books

    Motor Books Department, 224 West 57th Street
    New York, NY  United States  10019
  • Authors:
    • Zino, K
  • Publication Date: 1984-8

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: 2 p.
  • Serial:
    • Motor
    • Volume: 162
    • Issue Number: 2

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00393831
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-037 679
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: May 31 1985 12:00AM