INFLUENCES OF ALCOHOL, MONETARY INCENTIVE AND VISUAL INTERRUPTION UPON CONTROL USE DURING AUTOMOBILE DRIVING

Twenty male volunteers (ages 18-23) consumed five doses of alcohol (0, 29, 56, 83, 100 mg% BAC) on separate days and drove an instrumented car on a gymkhana course to investigate the influences of alcohol, monetary incentive to maintain a constant speed, and visual interruption by an opaque visor. Increasing alcohol doses raised the number of steering adjustments and accelerator movements. Alcohol interacted with the monetary incentive of constant speed by affecting both steering and accelerator use; alcohol also interacted with visual interruption to change accelerator use. The effects of visual interruption were similar to the effects of alcohol impairment, though the two variables acted independently and additively. The highest alcohol doses (83 and 100 mg% BAC) altered the responses to the financial incentive for constant speed in a manner that suggests the volunteers changed the priorities they allotted to driving subtasks.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Pergamon Press, Incorporated

    Headington Hill Hall
    Oxford OX30BW,    
  • Authors:
    • DAMKOT, D K
    • Kirk, R S
    • Huntley Jr, M S
  • Publication Date: 1983

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00393641
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-037 664
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Apr 29 1985 12:00AM