THE SIZE OF THE DRINK-DRIVING PROBLEM FOR ROAD SAFETY IN NEW SOUTH WALES--UPDATE 7TH JUNE, 1982

In 1981 blood alcohol analyses were conducted on 540 of the 650 drivers and motorcycle riders who died in crashes in New South Wales. Among these 540, 224 or 41.5 percent had illegal concentrations of alcohol when tested. Similar analyses for Victoria showed 39.4 to 48.7 percent with illegal concentrations over the years 1975 to 1979. Blood alcohol analysis of hospitalised motorists is compulsory in Victoria but not in New South Wales. In Victoria over the years 1978 to 1980, 20.5 percent of injured drivers and riders attending hospital had illegal concentrations. A similar result would be expected in New South Wales. Breath alcohol tests are conducted in New South Wales on many drivers and riders surviving crashes but no estimate can be made of the percentage who had illegal concentrations, because a sufficient proportion are not tested. For the dead drivers and motorcycle riders of New South Wales, drunk driving is primarily a problem for males, especially for those in the 20 to 24 year old bracket. However, 27 percent of those tested and who were aged 40 or more, had illegal concentrations.

  • Corporate Authors:

    New South Wales Traffic Authority, Australia

    Traffic Accident Research Unit
    Rosebery, New South Wales 2018,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Herbert, D C
  • Publication Date: 1982-7

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 13 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00393613
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TARU SR 82/118, HS-037 515
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Apr 29 1985 12:00AM