TASK LOAD AND STRESS ON THE ROAD: PRELIMINARIES TO A MODEL OF ROUTE CHOICE

As part of an effort to test Michaels' hypothesis on the relation between stress and driver route preference three experiments were performed with an instrumented car. The specific aspects these experiments concentrated on were: (a) the comparative evaluation of methods to measure stress and task load on the road; (b) the measurement of stress and task load in different road environments. Stress and load were shown to depend on the road environment. The motorway condition distinguished itself by leading to larger amounts of load and stress relative to the rural and city conditions, at least for males. An explanation of this result would have to consider the driving task as being a closed-loop, self-paced task, in which drivers can set their own level of task load within a range constrained by the environment. It is concluded, therefore, that the modelling of route choice along the lines suggested by Michaels had best concentrate on driver characteristics that could affect self-generated load and stress levels. (TRRL)

  • Corporate Authors:

    TNO INSTITUTE FOR PERCEPTION

    KAMPWEG 5, PO BOX 23
    SOESTERBERG,   Netherlands  3769 ZG
  • Authors:
    • Janssen, W H
    • Gaillard, AWK
  • Publication Date: 1984

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 34 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00393190
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Institute for Road Safety Research, SWOV
  • Report/Paper Numbers: 1984-C-10 Monograph
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 30 1985 12:00AM