DO DRIVERS OF SMALL CARS TAKE LESS RISK IN EVERYDAY DRIVING?

Previously reported observed data on risky everyday driving are brought together and reanalyzed in order to focus on the relation between risky driving and the size of the car being driven, as indicated by car mass. The measures of risky driving include separation between vehicles in heavy freeway traffic and speed on a two lane road. Observed seat belt use provides a third measure of driver risk. Confounding effects arising from the observed association between car mass and driver age are taken into account by segmenting the data into three driver age groups. Driver risk taking is found to increase with increasing car mass for each of these three aspects of everyday driving. The implications of these results with respect to driver fatality rates are discussed in terms of a simple model relating observed risky driving to the likelihood of involvement in a severe crash.

  • Corporate Authors:

    General Motors Corporation

    Research and Development Center, 30500 Mound Road
    Warren, MI  United States  48090
  • Authors:
    • Wasielewski, P
    • Evans, Leonard
  • Publication Date: 1983-7-13

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 17 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00392780
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: GMR-4425, HS-037 498
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT
  • Created Date: Feb 28 1985 12:00AM