MICROWAVE RADIOMETRIC DETECTION OF OIL SLICKS

Two years of research have been conducted to determine the feasibility of using microwave radiometry for the detection, identification, and surveillance of oil pollution. Theoretical studies consisted of a review of contemporary theory concerning parameters that influence microwave emission from both unpolluted and oil-covered seas. Laboratory investigations confirm results obtained from earlier studies and established the response characteristics of the 3.2-mm sensor to continuous oil films. Airborne measurements of controlled spills off the Southern California Coast were performed with dual-polarized 3.2- and 8.1-mm sensors oriented with a forward antenna viewing angle 45 deg above nadir. Four sets of oil spills, or missions, were performed to obtain data over a variety of sea-surface conditions. Pollutants used for the tests included No. 2 diesel fuel, 26.1 and 21.6 API gravity crude oils, and 9.7 API gravity fuel oil. Significant microwave brightness temperature oil slick signatures were noted for a wide range of ocean conditions (sea states 1-4) and oil film thickness (thickness less than 1 micron and greater). Based on the experimental results a passive microwave imaging system configuration has been recommended for oil pollution surveillance. (Author)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Aerojet General Corporation

    9200 East Flair Drive
    El Monte, CA  USA  91734
  • Authors:
    • Meeks, D C
    • Williams, D P
    • Wilcox, R M
    • Edgerton, A T
  • Publication Date: 1971-3

Media Info

  • Pagination: 72 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00024761
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: USCG-714104/A/002
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-CG-93228-A
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 14 1973 12:00AM