VALIDITY AND UTILITY OF EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON SEVERE WORK VEHICLE ACCIDENTS

Vehicles are involved in almost every other fatal occupational accident--even if commuting accidents are disregarded. Most of the fatalities occur with moving vehicles. Vehicle safety improvements have therefore been concentrated on the prevention either of dangerous vehicle motions (active safety) or of injuries upon impact (passive safety). Since retrospective accident analyses cannot provide sufficient details for vehicle and environmental improvements, a number of methods have been developed for research on critical phenomena--by experiments in the field and in the laboratory, as well as by computer simulation. Various applications require different degrees of complexity in the experimental models of human behaviour, of vehicle subsystems, and of the environment, if valid data are to be obtained without experiments inflicting unacceptable damage or injuries. Unfortunately, ignorance of driver-vehicle dynamics and biomechanics, as well as too superficial "common-sense" models, have led to large scale production of hazardous designs, such as articulated vehicles, rear wheel driving and steering, improper restraints, helmets, etc. The utility of some experimental techniques is illustrated with applications from e.g. Heavy vehicle dynamics, anti-locking brake systems, tyre characteristic evaluation, truck mounted attenuators, and occupant restraints. (TRRL)

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This paper was presented at the International Seminar on Occupational Accident Research Saltsjoebaden, Sweden, September 5-9, 1983.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Arbetarskyddsfonden

    P.O. Box 1122
    Stockholm,   Sweden 
  • Authors:
    • STRANDBERG, L
    • Turbell, T
  • Publication Date: 1983

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00382185
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute (VTI)
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 30 1984 12:00AM