CHOICE OF TRAVEL MODE FOR WORK TRIPS: SOME FINDINGS FOR METROPOLITAN TORONTO

This study analyses modal choice decisions in metropolitan Toronto, in order to establish whether rising petrol prices, traffic congestion and environmental pollution caused by cars, would imply fewer cars and an increased use of urban public transport. The analysis is based on an extension of existing modal choice models into a model which is fully consistent with the "new demand theory" as developed by Becker, Lancaster and others. The estimation procedure adopted is the McFadden random utility model. Findings of the study help to explain why the car is used for most urban trips in Toronto in spite of higher costs than for public transport. They also show that users are more responsive to improvements in public transport services than to reduction of fares. (TRRL)

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00387583
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 30 1984 12:00AM