IS THE CRISIS OF URBAN TRANSPORT ALSO A CRISIS OF TRANSPORT PLANNING?

In the present article an assumption is made according to which the expanding of road networks not only improves, but also reduces the individual possibilities of acting in time and space, above all for pedestrians and cyclists. As a consequence, they are often "forced" to use a motorized vehicle. Thus major road projects may have traffic producing effects, which sometimes reinforce instead of solving urban transport problems. In showing these negative effects and the measures to avoid them, the Hagerstrand's time-space model is employed. In the time-space diagram the spatial distribution of land uses and facilities, and the time controls of activities in a planning area are shown. In this diagram the daily routines of the individuals living in this area, and the time-space coordination requirements to realize these routines can be examined as well as the question of how they are affected by major road projects. Finally, the possible use of the time-space model in transport planning is demonstrated by a case study. (Author/TRRL)

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  • Accession Number: 00387581
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 30 1984 12:00AM