SOOT AND VALVE TRAIN WEAR IN PASSENGER CAR DIESEL ENGINES

The effect of the use of the EGR system on the lubrication of a passenger car diesel engine was investigated. The higher the EGR rate, the more soot in the oil. And the most detrimental effect was found in valve train wear. Some engine tests, including motoring tests, were carried out to investigate the contribution of soot to valve train wear. The mechanism of cam and rocker arm wear in used oils was studied by analyzing for elements on the lubricated metal surface and subsequently the mechanism was more thoroughly studied using the four-ball test. Soot seems to act as an abrasive on the anti-wear solid film formed by the oil on the metal surface and this film contains Ca, O, P and S. Some hardware modifications and oil formulations to reduce valve train wear are also discussed.

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  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Reprinted from SP-558 Lubricant and Additive Effects on Engine Wear. Fuels and Lubricants Meeting San Francisco, California, October 31-November 3, 1983.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)

    400 Commonwealth Drive
    Warrendale, PA  United States  15096
  • Authors:
    • Nagai, I
    • Endo, H
    • NAKAMURA, H
    • Yano, H
  • Publication Date: 1983

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00387427
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: SAE 831757 Reprint, HS-036 784
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 30 1984 12:00AM