ENERGY SHORTFALLS AND PEAK-HOUR TRANSIT CAPACITY PROBLEMS: THE 1979 EXPERIENCE

Effects of the 1979 energy shortfall on peak-hour transit capacity are analyzed. A short survey was sent to 102 transit operators in 100 urbanized areas throughout the United States; of these, 45 responses were received from 44 urbanized areas. The extent to which peak-hour capacity problems were created or heightened in the spring and summer of 1979, actions selected for 1979, the effectiveness and cost of those actions, implementation problems, and transit operators' recommendations for future crises of this nature are documented. Results indicate that systems in the Northeast and in urbanized areas with a population of more than 250,000 were most affected in terms of peak-hour capacity problems. The actions most often taken were relaxing using a reserve fleet of buses, changing maintenance practices, and encouraging programs for variable work hours. Changing operating standards is an excellent first move to make while other actions are being considered. Problems most often concerned finance, maintenance, personnel, and time requirements. The most effective actions tended to be the most costly.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 1-5
  • Monograph Title: ANALYSIS OF ISSUES IN ENERGY PLANNING AND ENERGY MODELING
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00386796
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 030903650X
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 30 1984 12:00AM