THE FIRST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FIRST AID AT THE SCENE OF AN ACCIDENT, ARRANGED BY THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR ACCIDENT AND TRAFFIC MEDICINE (IAATM), OSLO, NORWAY, 20-23 JUNE, 1979. SURVEY OF PAPERS PRESENTED, (NO. 3)

Ten papers on first aid to accident victims are surveyed. The Australian approach to teaching first aid to the public was discussed. The medical support facility at a race track in Canada was presented as a training model for first aid in motor vehicle accidents. Each section of the circuit is patrolled by a crew composed of a team coordinator who is trained in first aid, several fire and rescue people, and a communications worker who maintains contact with a central coordinator. The teams are available within 30 sec. and are backed up by a mobile team composed of a doctor, several ambulance attendants, and a fire and rescue team, available within less than two min. The importance of adequate training of ambulance personnel in resuscitation and life-support techniques was addressed, with specific reference to a scheme in Bristol, England for the advanced in-hospital training of ambulance attendants. A British technique for turning patients with spinal injuries involves the sandwiching of the casualty between two "scoop stretchers". Intravenous fluid therapy and analgesia and anaesthesia at the accident site were discussed by a Norwegian representative. Testing of groups of amateur and professional drivers and controls in terms of first-aid knowledge was reported by a Yugoslavian team; the results support the need for early and continued first-aid education of the public and especially the periodic reeducation of professional drivers. An analysis was reported of the layman's skill in restoring breathing to an accident victim; inadequate knowledge, due to lack of refresher training over the years, was demonstrated. Also reported were autopsy findings of traffic accident victims which showed that a large percentage of the deaths were the result of asphyxia due to some respiratory tract obstruction. Neck injury patterns in fatal traffic accident victims were presented, based on autopsy results of 130 casualties. Clinical results were reported for 100 cases of traumatic spine injuries with complete or incomplete cord lesions; the importance was stressed of maintaining an airway to prevent suffocation, even at risk of aggravating spinal injury.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • See also HS-029 179 and HS-029 180.
  • Corporate Authors:

    International Association for Accident and Traffic Medicine

    Huddinge University Hospital Center, Traffic Medicine Center
    Stockholm,   Sweden  141 86
  • Publication Date: 1980-3

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 8-10
  • Serial:
    • Journal of traffic medicine
    • Volume: 8
    • Issue Number: 1
    • Publisher: International Association for Accident and Traffic Medicine
    • ISSN: 0345-5564

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00386135
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-029 181
  • Files: HSL, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 28 1984 12:00AM