THE EFFECT OF REPEATED EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRIALS ON PERFORMANCE DURING EXTENDED-DURATION SIMULATED DRIVING

This investigation studied the effects of 30, 60, and 150 min of continuous driving on drivers' response times to repeated response trials in a simulated emergency--the sudden deceleration of a lead vehicle in a simulated car-following scenario. The results indicated that mean response times of early trials tended to be slower than those of later trials and those of baseline trials. These data imply that repeated response trials can modify decrements normally associated with fatigue mechanisms, and that studies using repeated response trials during driving may not yield valid indications of fatigue-induced performance decrements.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Human Factors Society

    Johns Hopkins University Press
    Baltimore, MD  United States  21218
  • Authors:
    • Muto, W H
    • Wierwille, W W
  • Publication Date: 1982-12

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 693-698
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00385588
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-035 865
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: May 30 1984 12:00AM