THE WORK AND POLICY OF THE COUNCIL FOR BUILDING AND CIVIL ENGINEERING OF BSI

The object of this article is to provide a synoptic view of the British Standards Institution (BSI), its difficulties and problems, and to place the work and policy of the Council for Building and Civil Engineering in that content. Standards committees have to frame priorities within their field and attempt to draw up standards through a consensus procedure. The factors considered range from financial return to national cost benefits and the practicability of implementation. Selection of priorities is difficult; only those projects of demonstrable value are allowed to enter the programme. Difficulties in interpreting standards has led to the formulation of a memorandum of understanding whereby government departments use British standards in legislation and purchasing wherever possible. Government departments will not produce standards themselves. Codes of practice fall into three parts: (1) a statement of the criteria to be met for acceptable safety and economy; (2) a statement of various analytical methods of demonstrating compliance with part (1); and (3) guidance in design choice to spread the best practice. The relationship between BSI permanent staff and the 30000 committee members needs to be sound and both need to recognise their respective responsibilities. (TRRL)

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  • Corporate Authors:

    INSTITUTION OF HIGHWAYS & TRANSPORTATION

    6 ENDSLEIGH STREET
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  WC1H 0DZ

    INSTITUTION OF HIGHWAYS & TRANSPORTATION

    6 ENDSLEIGH STREET
    LONDON,   United Kingdom  WC1H 0DZ
  • Authors:
    • Bridge, R J
  • Publication Date: 1983-11

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos;
  • Pagination: p. 15-19
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00385528
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 28 1984 12:00AM