PREDICTION OF ROADWAY STRENGTH FROM SOIL PROPERTIES

An intensive performance study of 120 Alaskan asphalt-paved roadway sections was completed in 1980. Roadway-bearing strengths were measured weekly on each section during the period of thaw weakening by means of a Benkelman beam-type test procedure. Soil properties and layer thicknesses were evaluated by use of test pit sampling. This study, which included sections from the different climatic regions of Alaska, has indicated certain soil particle sizes to be the most critical factor in crack-free performance and resistance to spring thaw weakening. The data acquired in the performance study have provided a basis for the development of a new method of pavement design. This method predicts the maximum seasonal or design deflection level from the percentages of particles smaller than 0.075 mm (No. 200 sieve) in the different granular soil layers beneath the asphalt pavement. Required pavement thicknesses for the predicted traffic and design deflection levels are then determined by a previously developed overlay design procedure. This method is demonstrated to be more reliable than previous designs based on the frost susceptibility classification of the pavement layers. (Author)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 30-34
  • Monograph Title: FROST ACTION ON TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00381784
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 030903561
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Mar 30 1984 12:00AM