EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL, DISTRIBUTION AND LEGISLATIVE ACTIVITIES ON RESTRAINT USAGE RATES FOR NORTH CAROLINA CHILDREN

Since 1977 the North Carolina Governor's Highway Safety Program (GHSP) and the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center (HSRC) have been working cooperatively in an effort to increase restraint usage rates for children and thus reduce the number of children being killed or injured in car crashes. This report provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of the GHSP/HSRC Child Restraint Project and of the North Carolina Child Passenger Protection Law which went into effect in July 1982. In summary, both the HSRC/GHSP educational and loaner activities and the implementation of the Child Passenger Protection Law have succeeded in their intents. Educational efforts alone increased usage rates to a level of 11 percent. The law precipitated a 60 percent increase in usage rates for both infants and toddlers between 1981 and 1982, but toddler usage rates (12.6 percent) remains one-third that for infants (37.6 percent). The conclusion is that the law should be expanded to include older children as well as infants.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

    Highway Safety Research Center
    Chapel Hill, NC  United States  27599
  • Authors:
    • Hall, W L
    • Daniel, R B
  • Publication Date: 1983-10

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 25 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00387054
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-036 368
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jul 30 1984 12:00AM