TRADE UNION SPONSORED OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING IN THE U.S. MARITIME INDUSTRY: THE UPGRADING AND RETRAINING PROGRAM OF THE NATIONAL MARITIME UNION

From 1946 to the early 1960's American seafaring unions were generally opposed to the operation of formal maritime industry training programs. This view was influenced by a chronic postwar oversupply of seamen and a secular decline in the U.S. shipping industry which resulted in underemployment for union members. After 1960, trade union interests in skill training increased in response to technological changes and the emergence of selected labor shortages. This study examines the objectives, structures, functions, and results of the National Maritime Union's upgrading and retraining program during its first 19 months of operation; from May 1966 through December 1967. A detailed analysis of an 11.5 percent sample of the 1,805 men accepted for training in six selected courses during this period showed that 73 percent enrolled as schedules, about 85 percent of the enrollees completed training, and 83 percent of the completers utilized their new skills at sea. The study evaluates these results and attempts to analyze their determinants.

  • Corporate Authors:

    New York State School of Industry and Labor Relations

    Cornell University
    Ithaca, NY  USA  14850
  • Authors:
    • Sprintzer, A D
  • Publication Date: 1971-6

Media Info

  • Pagination: 355 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00019520
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: DLMA-91-34-68-12-1 Final Rpt
  • Contract Numbers: DL-91-34-68-12-1
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 25 1971 12:00AM