CAUSES OF SHELLY SPOTS AND HEAD CHECKS IN RAIL- METHODS FOR THEIR PREVENTION

A summary of the performance of heat-treated rail in two test installations was presented. Progress on shelly rail studies at the University of Illinois was presented in appendix 10-a. Rolling-load tests of heat-treated rails, flame-hardened rails, alloy rails and headfree rails were performed. Laboratory examination of detail fractures from shelling was performed. Design and construction of a new cradle-type rolling machine was discussed. A description of the technique used to produce electron micrographs at 35,000X magnification was given. Rolling load tests continued on 132-lb heat-treated rail revealed that yield strength was increased 65 percent, tensile strength 31 percent, elongation 18 percent, reduction of area 100 percent, and endurance limit 40 percent. Results of rolling-load tests on seven rails flame-hardened different amounts on the rail treads showed four specimens failed by head and web separation cracks, and three failed by shelling. Rolling-load and physical tests on two specimens of alloy rail steel showed that these rails have physical properties which compare closely with those of heat-treated rails. Examinations of seven detail fractures from shelling revealed that the shelling cracks started longitudinally in the steel and then turned into transverse detailed fractures.

  • Corporate Authors:

    American Railway Engineering Association

    59 East Van Buren Street
    Chicago, IL  USA  60605
  • Publication Date: 1951

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 661-679
  • Serial:
    • AREA BULLETIN
    • Volume: 52
    • Publisher: American Railway Engineering Association

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00052440
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Association of American Railroads
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 15 1976 12:00AM