CAUSES OF SHELLY SPOTS AND HEAD CHECKS IN RAIL-METHODS FOR THEIR PREVENTION

Five service tests of rail are discussed. There are four of heat-treated rail and one of alloy rail. In the progressive study of shelly rail rolling-load tests of flame-hardened rails, high-silicon rails, and electric furnace steel rails were performed. Examination of shelly rails from service was performed. Rolling-load tests to produce detail fractures were done. The rolling-load tests indicate that stronger rail steel should give longer life before shelling develops in service. Study and testing on simulated rails indicated that plastic deformation is the major factor in shelly failure. Design changes and metallurgical changes to limit plastic deformation would improve rail life. Use of lower wheel loads, larger wheels and higher strength material is indicated. A photoelastic study of the stresses in a model of a railhead utilizing developments in three dimensional photoelasticity for a better understanding of rail shelling was presented. Plastic models of the prototype were thinly sliced and the data obtained were subjected to a field of polarized light. Processing the data was done by the shear difference method. Principal stresses and maximum shears were studied through loading tests. Principal stresses and maximum shears were found in the transverse section of the rail under the center of the wheel.

  • Corporate Authors:

    American Railway Engineering Association

    59 East Van Buren Street
    Chicago, IL  USA  60605
  • Publication Date: 1954

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 828-897
  • Serial:
    • AREA BULLETIN
    • Volume: 55
    • Publisher: American Railway Engineering Association

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00052418
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Association of American Railroads
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 15 1976 12:00AM