CAUSES OF SHELLY SPOTS AND HEAD CHECKS IN RAIL-METHODS FOR THEIR PREVENTION

This informational progress report is contained in two appendices. Appendix 8-a covers inspections of service tests of heat-treated and alloy-rail installations at 11 locations. There were five tests of heat-treated rail, three of high-silicon rail, and three of chrome-vanadium alloy rail. Heat-treated rail continues to show decided increased life over standard rail. Use of heat-treated rail on the low side of curves has increased life of rail 5 to 8 times, and on high sides 1 1/2 to 4 times. High-silicon rails have shown greater resistance to the detrimental effects of heavy wheel loads on the low side of curves than standard rails. Chrome-vanadium alloy rails show greater resistance to wear than standard rails. However, in this test the chrome-vanadium alloy steel of the composition used was unreliable. Appendix 8-b covers rolling-load tests to produce shelling in 136-lb high-silicon vanadium rails, failed shelly rails from service, and rolling-load tests to produce detail fractures from shelling. Results of tests of 115-lb columbian rail and tests of 133-lb rail single flame hardened by the Union Pacific Railroad are also reported.

  • Corporate Authors:

    American Railway Engineering Association

    59 East Van Buren Street
    Chicago, IL  USA  60605
  • Publication Date: 1961-2

Media Info

  • Features: Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 622-634
  • Serial:
    • AREA BULLETIN
    • Volume: 62 N
    • Issue Number: 563
    • Publisher: American Railway Engineering Association

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00052333
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Association of American Railroads
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 15 1976 12:00AM