A NOTE ON SURVIVAL RANGE OF RAILROAD PASSENGER SERVICE IN U.S.A.

Survival range for passenger service is defined as a range of parameters for which one transportation mode is competitive with the other alternates available. This range has been examined for the railroads as compared to auto and air transportation. Effective travel speed has been identified as the most important parameter which affects the survival range. It has been concluded that survival of intercity railroad passenger service at speeds below 50 mph is difficult. Survival range is estimated as a length of the trip for which railroads develop comparative advantage, while operating at various speeds. The ranges of the trip length for various speeds are: 60 mph--100-175 miles; 70 mph--100-250 miles; 80 mph 100-280 miles; 100 mph--100-375 miles; 150 mph--199-600 miles. A relationship between speed, survival range and passenger mile traffic has been developed. It has been shown that railroad passenger service needs to operate at effective speed above 70 mph for a resonable survival. For a healthy existence, it must operate at speeds above 100 mph. Significant federal and industrial effort is needed to achieve this.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Planning Transport Associates, Incorporated

    P.O. Box 4824, Duke Station
    Durham, NC  USA  27706

    Planning Transport Associates, Incorporated

    P.O. Box 4824, Duke Station
    Durham, NC  USA  27706
  • Authors:
    • Kumar, S
  • Publication Date: 1973-6

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00051892
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: High Speed Ground Transportation Journal
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 9 1974 12:00AM