How Have Craniofacial Injuries Changed in Adult Bicyclists Over the Past 10 Years?

As bicycling popularity grows in the United States, it becomes increasingly important to understand and characterize bicycle-related injuries. In this study, the authors sought to characterize craniofacial injuries in adult cyclists and to evaluate trends in injuries over the past 10 years. In this retrospective cohort study, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried for bicycle-related craniofacial injuries in adults aged 18 to 64 years from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2017. Variables examined included demographic characteristics, diagnosis, patient disposition, and change in number of injuries and age-adjusted incidence of injuries from 2008 to 2017. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate trends in injuries over time, with statistical significance set at P < .05. There were an estimated 573,305 visits to emergency departments across the United States for bicycle-related craniofacial injuries from 2008 to 2017. Male patients (75%), patients aged 18 to 24 years (25%), and white patients (54%) were injured most commonly. The population-adjusted incidence of total injuries increased by 22% from 2008 to 2017 (P = .13). The rates of traumatic brain injury and craniofacial fractures rose by 50% (P = .06) and 63% (P < .01), respectively. Cyclists aged 55 to 64 years had the highest increase in the age-adjusted incidence of injury from 2008 to 2017, by 54% (P < .01). Bicycle-related trauma remains a public health concern, with a steady number of craniofacial injuries presenting to emergency departments across the United States during the past 10 years. Injuries have increased for adults aged 55 to 64 years, and there has been a rise in more severe injuries including traumatic brain injury and craniofacial fractures.

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  • English

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  • Accession Number: 01765981
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jan 26 2021 3:06PM