Parametric Study on the Ground Control Effects of Rock Bolt Parameters under Dynamic and Static Coupling Loads

Dynamic and static coupling loads (DSLs) are one of the most common stress environments in underground engineering. As the depth of a roadway increases over the life of a mine, the static load of the ground stress field increase multiplies, and the cyclic operation at the working face releases a large amount of dynamic energy. Therefore, deep roadways easily induce dynamic disasters during production. In this paper, a deep roadway numerical model was built with FLAC³ᴰ to test the deep roadway under DSLs and was simulated with 16 different support designs. The ground stability in each support condition was examined and compared in terms of the ground deformation and scope of failure. The underlying support mechanism was further analyzed with numerical modeling in view of the deformation in the surrounding rock mass induced by variations in the support parameters. The results show that shortening the bolt spacing is an effective measure to control the deformation of surrounding rock whatever DSLs or static load. Under static load, the larger the anchoring length is, the more stable the surrounding rock is. Under DSLs, end grouting length (S=600 mm) and full grouting length S=1800 mm) can effectively control the deformation of surrounding rocks and enhance the stability of surrounding rocks. The results contribute to the design of supports in the field of underground coal mines and provide a basis for determining the reasonable support scheme for roadways.

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    • © 2020 Zequan Sun et al.
  • Authors:
    • Sun, Zequan
    • Jiang, Lishuai
    • Jiang, Jinquan
    • Wu, Xingyu
    • Golsanami, Naser
    • Huang, Wanpeng
    • Zhang, Peipeng
    • Niu, Zhongtao
    • He, Xiaoyi
  • Publication Date: 2020-7

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  • English

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  • Accession Number: 01745654
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 22 2020 2:40PM