PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF HIGHWAY SAFETY COUNTERMEASURES. VOLUME III: ALCOHOL AND DRUG RESEARCH

This volume, part of a larger study on public attitudes towards proposed highway safety countermeasures for alcohol and drugs, unsafe driving behaviors, and pedestrian safety, discusses reactions to breath testers, drunk-driving deterrence techniques, and roadside surveys. Although not a safety strategy, roadside surveys are necessary to obtain accurate measures of drivers' impairment conditions in order to develop appropriate highway safety programs. Safety strategy acceptability issues in the public survey are presented in relation to demographic characteristics, personal drinking habits, perceived countermeasure effectiveness, and perception of the drinking-driving problem; while likelihood of participation, personal safety, validity of information obtained, and logistical factors in data collection mark the criteria for evaluating roadside surveys. Legal and liability concerns, cost and implementation issues, potential effectiveness, and perceived public opposition exemplify dimensions used by special interest group members to evaluate countermeasure strategies.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • See also Volume 2, PB82-110420, and Volume 4, PB82-110446. Also available in set of 5 reports PC E19, PB82-110404.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Mathematica Policy Research, Incorporated

    P.O. Box 2393
    Princeton, NJ  United States  08540

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590
  • Authors:
    • Vayda, A
    • Crespi, I
  • Publication Date: 1981-6

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Tables;
  • Pagination: 225 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00346123
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: MPR/PRS-71-24-V3 Final Rpt., HS-805 972
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-6-01466
  • Files: HSL, NTIS, TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Dec 22 1982 12:00AM