MAXIMUM DECELERATION AND JERK LEVELS THAT ALLOW RETENTION OF UNRESTRAINED, SEATED TRANSIT PASSENGERS

Three experiments performed to determine the maximum deceleration and associated rate of change of deceleration (jerk) that will allow the majority of potential users of automated guideway transportation systems to remain securely in their seats are described. In each experiment subjects representative of three anthropometric classes underwent various levels of deceleration and jerk. These experiments were performed in an instrumented vehicle controlled by an automated braking system. Seat sensors, movies, and subject ratings were employed to determine the deceleration at which subjects began to move off the set pan. Subjects were decelerated while seated normally, sideways, and forward facing but tilted backward (facing forward with the seat pan tilted back 3, 9, or 12 deg). Subjects underwent jerk levels of 0.25, 0.75, and 1.25 g/s while seated normally only. Jerk was found not to affect maximum deceleration levels. Modifications of features common to transit seating were found to increase retention. The maximum deceleration allowing retention was determined for both forward- and side-facing seated passengers. These results are discussed and presented in tabular and graphic form. (Author)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 45-51
  • Monograph Title: Maintenance Management Systems and Transportation Ride Quality
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00334186
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309031184
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1982 12:00AM