THE EFFECTS OF PUBLIC EDUCATION ON SUBJECTIVE PROBABILITY OF ARREST FOR IMPAIRED DRIVING: A FIELD STUDY

A public education campaign designed to increase impaired drivers' subjective probability of arrest was implemented and evaluated. The campaign stressed implications of recent changes in the Canadian criminal code. A quasi-experimental design was used for evaluation such that in the two test cities the law changed and the campaign was presented. In one control city the law changed and the campaign was delayed. In the other control city neither the law was changed nor the campaign shown. Significant increases in knowledge of the changes in legislation occurred in the test cities but not in controls. Subjective probability of arrest for impaired driving (spaid) also increased in the test cities but not in controls. Increases in spaid were maintained over a three month period despite declines in knowledge about the legislation, suggesting that variables other than public education may have affected spaid over time. It is concluded that the immediate increases in knowledge and spaid were due to the influence of the campaign and that the long term increase in spaid could not be unequivocally attributed to the effects of public education. (Author/TRRL)

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Pergamon Press, Incorporated

    Maxwell House, Fairview Park
    Elmsford, NY  United States  10523
  • Authors:
    • Cousins, L S
  • Publication Date: 1980-6

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00334094
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1981 12:00AM