SEAT BELT USAGE AND RISK-TAKING BEHAVIOR AT TWO MAJOR INTERSECTIONS

The present study was designed to explore the correlation between non-use of seat belts and risk-taking behavior by drivers. It was hypothesized that: (1) Drivers who ran red lights would show a lower rate of seat belt use than other drivers, and (2) Drivers who were the first to stop at red lights would show a higher rate of seat belt use than those who ran the red light. At 70% of the light changes at least one driver and sometimes as many as five drivers started through the light or were in the intersection after the light had turned to red. These 90 drivers comprised 2.9% of all the drivers in the study (Table 2). Only one of them was wearing a seat belt. (Author)

  • Corporate Authors:

    American Association for Automotive Medicine

    P.O. Box 222
    Morton Grove, IL  USA  60053
  • Authors:
    • Deutsch, D
    • Sameth, S
    • Akinyemi, J
  • Publication Date: 1981-1

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00331744
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1981 12:00AM