SHORT-TERM IMPACTS OF A SUBURBAN RAIL RAPID TRANSIT STATION: STUDY RESULTS FOR SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND

Results of a before-and-after study for the Silver Spring station of the Washington, D.C., Metro rail rapid transit system are presented. The study focused on the short-term impacts on the Silver Spring business district of the initiation of rail service and coordinated changes in collector and community transit services. Findings are reported for several impact categories, including transit use, changes in travel habits, traffic and parking impacts, and the community's perceptions of Metro. There were significant initial increases in transit use in the station service area: about 100 percent for regional service and about 200 percent for local services. The percentage of transit work trips to Silver Spring increased from 10 to 13 percent. Approximately 40 percent of midday nonwork trips made by Silver Spring employees into the District of Columbia were made by Metro. Surveys at the station show that a significant proportion--approximately 60 percent--of Metro riders in the morning peak period get to the station by bus and another 16 percent walk. Parking became the most serious negative impact of the station; 1500 daily parkers were added to the parking supply in Silver Spring, which increased the peak-hour occupancy for long-term spaces from 80 to 92 percent. However, this was partly offset by increased use of transit to Silver Spring. Special attitudinal surveys of Silver Spring businesses and residents indicated that, in spite of short-term problems, the overall impact of the station was positive. (Authors)

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Maps; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 1-7
  • Monograph Title: Rail transit planning and rail stations
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00330166
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309031001
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Apr 15 1982 12:00AM