THE 1979 ENERGY CRISIS: WHO CONSERVED HOW MUCH?

The purpose of this paper is to determine in actual savings what the nature of public response has been so far and is likely to be in the future. The following conclusions are drawn: (1) Consumer behavior under energy constraints is not well understood; (2) Narrow governmental focus solely on transit and ridesharing is unproductive because it encourages actions that in total save little energy and constrain mobility; (3) Because replacement behavior by consumers may have impacts on other dimensions (e.g., declines in driving slower affect safety), governments should be particularly aware of possible negative impacts and losses in energy savings; and (4) Relative savings effort (e.g., savings per household) should not be viewed too rigorously.

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    • Distribution, posting, or copying of this PDF is strictly prohibited without written permission of the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences. Unless otherwise indicated, all materials in this PDF are copyrighted by the National Academy of Sciences. Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. This paper appeared in Transportation Research Special Report No. 191, Considerations in Transportation Energy Contingency Planning. Proceedings of the National Energy Users' Conference.
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    Transportation Research Board

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  • Authors:
    • Hartgen, David T
    • Neveu, Alfred J
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  • Publication Date: 1980

Media Info

  • Media Type: Digital/other
  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 157-165
  • Monograph Title: CONSIDERATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONTINGENCY PLANNING
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    Open Access (libre)

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00330114
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Oct 28 1981 12:00AM