A TECHNIQUE FOR PREVENTION OR REMOVAL OF BIOFOULING FROM SURFACES EXPOSED TO THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT

Direct electrolytic hypochlorination of surfaces exposed to the marine environment is an effective technique for prevention or removal of biofouling. The surfaces to be protected or cleaned are first coated with a thin platinum film and made the anode in an electrochemical circuit using seawater as the electrolyte. Tests demonstrated that an electrical current density as low as 0.022 mA/cm square applied continuously to a surface exposed in ocean water for seven months prevented biofouling from occurring on that surface. Initial test results indicate that intermittent energizing of the electrochemical circuit for short periods on an 8 or 24 hours cycle is also effective in preventing biofouling. Removal of existing fouling using this technique was demonstrated on several specimens, including one with a three-month accumulation of micro- and macrofouling. The biofouling was completely removed within a 24-hour peiod using a current density of 0.5 mA/cm square.

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 39-48

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00329920
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Volume 4 Proceeding
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 15 1981 12:00AM