THE U.S. AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY, 1980. REPORT TO THE PRESIDENT FROM THE SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION

This review of recent developments in the automobile industry also explores the likely outgrowths of those developments in the post-1985 period, and evaluates their potential effects on the auto industry, on its workers, on the communities in which they work and on the country's economy. The conclusions drawn from this review are presented. The U.S. auto market is becoming more like those of the rest of the world and U.S. automakers will face stiff competition from the world's automakers in the home market. To strengthen their threatened positions, U.S. automakers must overcome a number of challenges relating to facilities, equipment, design, financing, productivity, and labor. The uncertain demand for autos, and the barriers to trade erected by other countries will add to U.S. trends to locate production facilities abroad, and to buy components from foreign sources. These conditions will all affect a multitude of auto-related industries and auto-related employment opportunities. The changing demand for autos, the nature of the transition, international competitiveness, financial issues, changes in the automotive industries, unemployment, and regional dislocations are all reviewed in some detail.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Office of the Secretary of Transportation

    1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
    Washington, DC  United States  20590
  • Publication Date: 1981-1

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: 99 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00330729
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: DOT-P-10-81-02
  • Files: TRIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1981 12:00AM