AN ECONOMIST'S VIEW OF THE MULTIPLE OBJECTIVES OF GOVERNMENT IN ROAD FUNDING AND THE SETTING OF DESIGN STANDARDS

In funding roads and setting design standards, government tries to meet a number of the community's objectives. Some of these are already embraced in assessment techniques but they tend to be the impacts on individuals, so that assessment is largely a summation over individual impacts. The collective objectives are, in principle, also part of a full economic assessment but, with a few exceptions, it is difficult to measure the importance of these objectives. Nevertheless, they are influential in government decisions, and it may be useful to give more formal attention to them. One problem is that the community's objectives are not always well defined and there may be mixed and even conflicting signals from the major indicators: government statements, government actions, attitude surveys and the revealed preferences of individuals. Prestige is a significant factor in road standards, particularly in the case of national highways. When components of the national highway standards are examined it appears that various forms of prestige and other values have added significantly to the usual objectives taken into account when setting standards (a). (TRRL)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Bureau of Transport Economics, Australia

    Allara Street
    Canberra City, A.C.T. 2601,   Australia 
  • Authors:
    • Taplin, JHE
  • Publication Date: 1980-5

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 10 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00329647
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: ARRB Group Ltd.
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: May 21 1981 12:00AM