TRANSPORT SYSTEM MANAGEMENT IN SAN FRANCISCO: AN ASSESSMENT

The paper reports the results of a transportation corridor study. The emphasis in the study is in transportation system management (TSM) policies although some capital intensive alternatives are also considered. The results suggest that currently popular TSM policies in USA, even when augmented with capital intensive changes, have only marginal impacts on modal choices. These currently popular policies, high occupancy vehicle priority lanes, improved bus and express bus service, increased feeder bus service and so forth, appear to confer benefits to well to do suburbanites but do not improve the transportation of urban dwellers. Another interesting result is that if user costs were increased to cover the full costs of transportation the transit fares for low income people would increase ten percent and the increase for urban dwellers would be about 20 percent. Interestingly, there would be no change in bus fares for either group. However, for high income travellers and suburbanites the increase in transit fares would be in excess of 100 percent. Thus, the current fare structure is inequitable making the low income people and the urban dwellers to pay a much larger share of their transportation costs than the often well to do suburbanites. (Author/TRRL)

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  • Corporate Authors:

    GORDON AND BREACH SCIENCE PUB.

    AMSTERDAM:
    ,    
  • Authors:
    • Talvitie, A
  • Publication Date: 1980

Media Info

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00325108
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport Research Laboratory
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 16 1982 12:00AM