METALLURGICAL STUDY OF THE FACTORS AFFECTING THERMAL FATIGUE CRACKING IN RAILWAY WHEEL AND TYRE STEELS

The British Steel Corporation has employed a simulation involving alternate heating and quenching of the rim of a rotating disc, to study the nucleation and growth of thermal fatigue cracks in steels for railway wheel and tire applications. At a maximum temperature of 500 degree C the high temperature strength of alloy steels was found to prevent plastic deformation during cycling and thermal fatigue damage was minimal compared with carbon steels which underwent plastic deformation. At 650-700 degree C the alloy steels showed thermal fatigue cracking and the best resistance to damage was found in low strength carbon steels. At 750 degree C the alloy steels formed martensite during the quench cycle and their thermal fatigue damage increased relative to carbon steels. In alloy steels the amount of thermal fatigue damage was largely controlled by the hardenability. Results indicate that low strength carbon steels represent the best type currently available for thermal fatigue resistance over a wide range of temperatures.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • International Conference on Railway Braking, University of York, England, September 26-27, 1979.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Institution of Mechanical Engineers

    1 Birdcage Walk
    London SW1H 9JJ,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Coleman, T H
    • Naylor, D J
  • Conference:
  • Publication Date: 1979

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 115-124

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00324895
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Engineering Index
  • Report/Paper Numbers: 1979-11 Conf Paper
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 6 1981 12:00AM