SUB-LETHAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS ON ACTIVITIES OF MARINE MICROORGANISMS. I. ECOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CHEMOTAXIS BY MARINE BACTERIA. II. INHIBITION OF INTER-MICROBIAL PREDATION BY CHLORINATED HYDROCARBONS

Chemotaxis in marine bacteria is shown to be the basis for spatial location in moving aquatic ecosystems. Such response is of importance in the location of prey by bacterial predators. The introduction of a wide variety of compounds results in inhibition or enhancement of the bacterial chemotactic response with specific response dependent upon compound concentration. This observed dependence of level of chemotactic response on concentration suggests that more than one compound can be present in that receptor complex which dictates whether cell motion will be in a linear or a tumbling fashion. Low concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons cause a decline in the rate of kill of intestinal bacteria in seawater. This decline is associated with a blockage of chemotactic responses in motile bacteria which prey on Escherichia Coli. (Author)

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Interim Technical Report.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Harvard University

    Division of Engineering and Applied Science, 29 Oxford Street
    Cambridge, MA  USA  02138
  • Authors:
    • Mitchell, R
    • Walsh, F
    • Asketh, P
  • Publication Date: 1973-10

Media Info

  • Pagination: 22 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00054294
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: TR-5
  • Contract Numbers: N00014-67A-0298-0026
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 14 1974 12:00AM