TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM MANAGEMENT: OBSERVATIONS AND COMMENTS ON FUTURE DIRECTIONS

The author notes that the TSM concept seems to have become thoroughly institutionalized in the transportation planning process. He attributes this to its compatibility with a set of values and concerns that have emerged in the U.S. in recent years: the emerging conservation ethic, the growing fiscal conservatism, a new emphasis on reusing the old rather than throwing it away, and a newfound awarness that the age of cheap, unlimited energy is over. Typical TSM activities-small-scale, incremental actions whose effects are confined to communities or neighborhoods-seem more suitable for local initiative and implementation and thus raise doubts in the author's mind of the importance of TSM at the regional level. The need is stressed for taking greater account of role of the private sector in TSM implementation. Many TSM initiatives (e.g. flexible working hours, vanpools, off-street parking management, pedestrian malls) are significantly dependent on the initiative, support and good will of private enterprise. Attention is called to such less galmourous TSM actions being introduced at the local level as residential parking programs, traffic diversion, commuter parking bans and street closings. Finally, the author calls for the use of TSM in rail planning (e.g. the joint use of rail facilities by freight and commuter services, i.e. tracking sharing).

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: p 10-11
  • Monograph Title: Transportation system management in 1980: state of the art and future directions
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00319364
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Dec 30 1981 12:00AM