ON THE HOOK, PART 5 -- AND BELOW THE HOOK

In the fifth of a series of articles on "mobile" cranes, the author goes on from considering various forms of cranes and their role as prime lifting equipment to consider the other half of the lifting process, i.e. the equipment used to attach the load to the crane hook. In the trade this is referred to as below the hook. No attempt is made to review the enormous range of lifting gear available on the market, but special mention is made of the lifting beam or spreader bar, normally purpose-designed items which enable a particular load to be lifted in a particular way. Use of a lifting beam overcomes two of the most common problems in many lifting operations. The first of these is the incorrect use of double legged slings. Examples of correctly and incorrectly slung loads are illustrated. The second instance where a spreader bar should be used is where out-of-balance loads are to be lifted, and if this is done fairly frequently it will pay to have a spreader bar specially designed for the work. All below the hook equipment must be examined on a regular basis. There are four major sets of regulations covering testing requirements. The safest way of dealing with routine testing is to employ a professional firm to carry it out. There are a number of companies able to do this on a regular basis for customers, supplying both reports and a register which meets all legal requirements. The cost of such a service is unlikely to exceed 300 English Pound a year, and for the majority of companies will be a lot less. Given the right care and maintenance, lifting equipment can give up to 30 years of useful life. The major causes of damage are sheer lack of maintenance, incorrect use, and overloading. Examples of the wide range of hooks available are illustrated, and summaries of requirements for testing and for examining are presented in table form.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Copies of the original material available to members at a cost of 0.15 pounds per page, and to non-members at 0.30 pounds per page to include postage. There will be a minimum charge of 3.00 pounds to members and 6.00 pounds to non-members for this service.
  • Corporate Authors:

    IPC Industrial Press Limited

    Dorset House, Stamford Street
    London SE1 9LU,   England 
  • Authors:
    • Boynton, P
  • Publication Date: 1980-3

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00319006
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: International Cargo Handling Coordination Assn
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 8 1980 12:00AM